Author: Rob Enderle

As President and Principal Analyst of the Enderle Group, Rob provides regional and global companies with guidance in how to create credible dialogue with the market, target customer needs, create new business opportunities, anticipate technology changes, select vendors and products, and practice zero dollar marketing. For over 20 years Rob has worked for and with companies like Microsoft, HP, IBM, Dell, Toshiba, Gateway, Sony, USAA, Texas Instruments, AMD, Intel, Credit Suisse First Boston, ROLM, and Siemens.

Cisco is a fascinating company to watch because they seem to spend an unusual amount of time on projects that address industry and societal problems. A case in point is this week’s presentation lead by Laura Quintana, Vice President & General Manager, Cisco Networking Academy, on the Cisco Networking Academy program. This effort focuses not only on taking people with low paying jobs or who are unemployed and giving them a career but also on eliminating the huge gap in workforce skills, causing a drag on technology growth and revenues. We have homeless, wage disparity problems, and entire cities that…

Read More

We tend to fight against change. We like things we’ve become comfortable with to stay the same even—or maybe even mainly—if there is a better way.  Change generally brings risk, and change, for change’s sake, is almost always stupid.  But, when the current way of doing things isn’t working, change is needed, and the effort should be focused on finding a better way, not fighting change. These thoughts all came to mind last week while I was speaking on a panel on health and wellbeing.  All of us argued the core of the problem was education; if we weren’t taught…

Read More
5G

The war between Huawei and the US has never made much sense to me. It seemed more like some personal tiff that got out of control than crime and punishment. There was little evidence, a lot of allegations, no trial, and then sanctions. But there has been a substantial adverse impact on the US for this fight in terms of image, technology readiness and strategic market leadership. Let’s explore that this week. Perception The process that typically surrounds crime and punishment is called due process. It consists of gathering evidence, making allegations, a trial, and then, if found guilty, consistent…

Read More

This month one of the most popular actors out of “The Mandalorian” Lucas Film TV series was terminated because of a Tweet. Gina Carano is far from the first and likely will not be the last. She wasn’t just terminated; when a major studio like this fires you, getting work as an actor may be impossible because no studio wants to hire a problem. This outcome could have been prevented with an AI tool that kept her from retweeting a meme that would most certainly cause Disney to terminate her. Disney’s hot buttons are well known, and when I first…

Read More
HP

HP’s partner program is unique in the market. Most firms treat their partners unevenly depending on whoever is running the effort at the time. Virtually all vendors give their programs lip service in terms of it being necessary and talk about making it easier to work with partners and balance between their internal sales groups and the partners who often compete over the same accounts. At HP, partners seem to be treated more like family, and their partner events feel more like revival meetings than the typical event their peers put on. You’d likely have to attend events by HP…

Read More

To say I’m a car nut would be an understatement. I started driving at 9, got my license when I was 15, and have had a car hobby for much of my life. But as cars advanced, my ability to tinker with them has significantly declined. Things stopped being intuitive in the 1970s with the plumber’s nightmare of anti-smog devices, which lowered gas mileage and destroyed performance. Then came the computers and the habit of layering in technology from different vendors making it increasingly hard to diagnose problems, let alone fix them without expensive diagnostic gear. Cars did get safer,…

Read More

One of the things that drives me nuts when I look at corporate policies is stupid practices that have become institutionalized. For instance—and I’m not pointing to any specific company—when a person is promoted to a level beyond their capability and fail, they are typically fired rather than returned to the level where they were successful. Or when an executive or employee leaves the company, they fall off the map rather than get put on a list of potential priority candidates as known quantities. What brought this up is Pat Gelsinger—who doesn’t officially start at Intel until February—has already started…

Read More

The car segment at CES has always been a feast for the eyes and often a showcase of how large companies didn’t get technology trends. I was invited to a session five or so years ago where I got to talk to the then Ford CEO, and he asked for feedback; I said: “if you don’t work to understand Tesla better and why people love that company, you are likely to lose your job.” The dedicated car analysts in the room nicely called me an idiot, and Tesla’s valuation passed Ford’s, and that CEO was let go. I don’t know…

Read More

What I think is interesting is that CES (the enormous annual Consumer Electronics Show) has become the leading showcase of what is becoming one of the most significant changes in the car industry since the invention of the car. The world is moving back to electric vehicles to reduce global warming and turning these vehicles into rolling iPods, or entertainment pods that drive themselves. Here are some of the things to look for at the show. The General Motors Keynote General Motors is one of the more exciting firms driving the move to electric vehicles (here is a video I…

Read More

For a time, I seemed to collect degrees, and my first was in Marketing. Before I moved into technology, I’d been both a Marketing Director and a board member of a national marketing association. Over the years, I’ve found that engineering-driven firms often don’t understand marketing, which you might call a soft science—untruthful. In fact, at IBM, one of the most ethical companies globally, I had a conversation with a Director of Marketing, who explained that marketing at IBM (at the time) was like selling air. In other words, people had no choice but to buy your product so you…

Read More